Category Archives: Words

Naaltsoos Sání, The Treaty of Bosque Redondo

Summary:

On June 1, 1868, the United States Government created the Treaty of Bosque Redondo with the Diné people after years of failing to force Navajos and Mescalero Apaches to establish a new homeland at Fort Sumner, New Mexico. That treaty is known today by Navajo people as Naaltsoos Sání, or the “Old Paper” or “the […]

Tsé Bit’a’í

Summary:

In Navajo, tsé is the word for “rock” and bit’a’í refers to a wing. You may remember that one word for wing is at’a’. With the stem -‘í in bit’a’í, feathers are being referenced in such a way that their position can be described as extending in some “thin” fashion. Overall, this contributes to the […]

Kéyah

Summary:

The Navajo word kéyah means “land” in English. In an earlier post, I described the Four Corners area of the Southwest U.S. The Navajo and Hopi Nations are described in Navajo using the word bikéyah. Today, Navajoland is considered the largest tribal nation in the U.S., in terms of land base. It is 17,046,112.51 acres […]

Running

Summary:

Starting out I will run to the east: Ha’a’aahjigo dighádídeeshwoł. I am starting to run: K’ad dahdiishyeed. I need to get ready: Hasht’e’í’ dideeshnííł yę́ę. A Bit of Cultural Perspective It’s early. The eastern horizon still has a few twinkling stars hanging low. A faint brightening of the sky tells you it’s time to get up. And even […]

Waking Up

Summary:

Here are some ideas and phrases about getting up in the morning – some things you might hear at the very beginning of the day. Opening your eyes My eyes are closed: Níínshch’il. I am opening my eyes: Dishghaał; or, shináá’ ąą’ áshłééh. My eyes are open: Shináá’ ąą’ át’é; or, díínísh’į́į́’. Laying down I am […]